Sannce Wireless HD IP Camera Live Stream Via Browser

Sannce Wireless HD IP Camera Live Stream Via Browser

I recently acquired a SANNCE I21AN HD 720P Video Two-way Audio WIFI IP Camera. The setup was a breeze, but no where in the quick operation guide could I find anything on how to connect to it via IP address. I headed to the Sannce website to download the manual but the download link was not available.

After spending a while trying to get more info on the topic in their FAQ, it was clear that the information was not readily available. Long story short, below you will find instructions to view the live stream from your SANNCE HD 720P wireless IP camera.

How to connect to your Sannce Wireless HD IP Camera Live Stream Via Browser

First you have to find out what IP address your IP camera was assigned when you connected it to your network.

I used a free tool Advanced IP Scanner to scan my network.

Advanced IP scanner

After determining what the Sannce HD camera IP address is, you need to find out what port the web server is running on. I used Advanced port scanner.

Advanced port scanner

As you can see from the screen capture, port 19350 TCP is used for the HTTP Daemon (web service).

For the next step, use Internet explorer, as it is the only web browser that supports Live stream in HD.

Enter the IP address and port in the url, Example: Http://192.168.1.52:19350 then hit enter.

Your browser might come up with an "OCX control is not installed", select the Install link and install the OCX control.

ocx

Once the OCX control is installed you should be able to see the "Wireless Camera" menu.

Choose  "Livestream mode for Internet Explorer"

sannce wireless camera livestream

You should now be able to connect to your Sannce Wireless HD IP Camera Live Stream Via Browser.

sannce camera live stream on browser

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Phone scammers pose as Telstra employee

Phone scammers posing as Telstra Bigpond

As of today 15 November 2017 the "Phone scammers posing as Telstra technical support" is still doing the rounds.

I am gobsmacked by how easily people are fooled by these scammers. I had a client phone me up at 11:20 pm last night, frantically suggesting that she had been "hacked" and that she had given the "hacker" her bank account details and a copy of her passport. I asked her to drop off her computer at my office so that I could investigate.

The next day she arrived giving me more details about her unpleasant ordeal. My mouth hung open at how gullible she was, she elaborated on the motive of  attack. "I was on the phone for five hours with him, he said I have been hacked! He would help me for a small fee. It sounded legit so I did it"

How The Scam Works

  • You receive a phone call from someone claiming to be a representative of Telstra or BigPond
  • They claim your computer has been hacked or infected with malware and they need access to your computer to help
  • They ask that you install a remote access application so that they can access your computer 
  • In order to fix the problem they ask for payment

What To Do

If at some point you realise that you have been victim to this scam follow these steps:

  • Unplug your computer from the internet or switch it off
  • If you have given the scammer details about your bank, call your bank notifying them of your concern
  • Report the incident to ScammWatch
  • Report the incident to the Police
  • Call an IT Professional that can remove the remote access application, clean your computer of malware and validate that it is safe to use

How To Protect Yourself From Being Scammed

  • If you receive a phone call from someone claiming to be a representative of Telstra, take their details and hang up. Call the official Telstra support desk (https://www.telstra.com.au/contact-us) and tell them about your concern
  • Never give your personal, credit card or online account details over the phone unless you made the call and the phone number came from a trusted source
  • Never give a stranger remote access to your computer, even if they claim to be from a reputable business
  • Use a reputable, up to date anti-virus and anti-spyware
  • Do regular full system Anti-Virus scans of your computer
  • Keep your operating system up to date via automatic updates
  • Have offsite backups of your valuable data
  • Use a drive encryption system